Tag Archives: Books

Generative Design: Visualize, Program, and Create with Processing

Generative design is a revolutionary new method of creating artwork, models, and animations from sets of rules, or algorithms. By using accessible programming languages such as Processing, artists and designers are producing extravagant, crystalline structures that can form the basis of anything from patterned textiles and typography to lighting, scientific diagrams, sculptures, films, and even fantastical buildings. Opening with a gallery of thirty-five illustrated case studies, Generative Design takes users through specific, practical instructions on how to create their own visual experiments by combining simple-to-use programming codes with basic design principles. A detailed handbook of advanced strategies provides visual artists with all the tools to achieve proficiency. Both a how-to manual and a showcase for recent work in this exciting new field, Generative Design is the definitive study and reference book that designers have been waiting for.

Make: Getting Started with p5.js

With p5.js, you can think of your entire Web browser as your canvas for sketching with code!

Learn programming the fun way–by sketching with interactive computer graphics! Getting Started with p5.js contains techniques that can be applied to creating games, animations, and interfaces. p5.js is a new interpretation of Processing written in JavaScript that makes it easy to interact with HTML5 objects, including text, input, video, webcam, and sound. Like its older sibling Processing, p5.js makes coding accessible for artists, designers, educators, and beginners.

Written by the lead p5.js developer and the founders of Processing, this book provides an introduction to the creative possibilities of today’s Web, using JavaScript and HTML.

With Getting Started with p5.js, you’ll:

  • Quickly learn programming basics, from variables to objects
  • Understand the fundamentals of computer graphics
  • Create interactive graphics with easy-to-follow projects
  • Learn to apply data visualization techniques
  • Capture and manipulate webcam audio and video feeds in the browser

The Nature of Code

How can we capture the unpredictable evolutionary and emergent properties of nature in software?

How can understanding the mathematical principles behind our physical world help us to create digital worlds?

This book focuses on a range of programming strategies and techniques behind computer simulations of natural systems, from elementary concepts in mathematics and physics to more advanced algorithms that enable sophisticated visual results. Readers will progress from building a basic physics engine to creating intelligent moving objects and complex systems, setting the foundation for further experiments in generative design.

Subjects covered include forces, trigonometry, fractals, cellular automata, self-organization, and genetic algorithms.

The book’s examples are written in Processing, an open-source language and development environment built on top of the Java programming language.

Making Things Move

Making Things Move: DIY Mechanisms for Inventors, Hobbyists, and Artists

Making Things Move reveals practical mechanical design principles to readers who may have no background in engineering and shows how to apply those principles through a wide range of sample projects, from art installations to toys to labor-saving devices.

This book is for anyone who has ever wanted to make something that moves but didn’t know where to start. Maybe you’re a sculptor who wants your artwork to spin around on a pedestal, or a musician who wants to make custom musical instruments that come alive. Whatever the case may be, this book will show you how to turn your ideas into reality.

Makers no longer need to have a machine shop in their garage or an arsenal of spare parts lying around. You can make 3D models using free software, then actually get them printed in 3D at any number of online shops. Heck, you can even make your own 3D printer! Or cut just about any 2D shape you want out of a variety of materials at Ponoko. Combine these with off the shelf parts and simple hand tools and the possibilities are endless.

Conditional Design

“Conditional Design” is the name of a new design ethos formulated by graphic designers Luna Maurer, Jonathan Puckey and Roel Wouters, and artist Edo Paulus. It espouses a working method that involves drawing up arbitrary constraints and rules of play, fostering both a strongly collaborative spirit and unpredictable end results. Conditional Design provides beautifully simple ideas for open, collaborative processes in art and design. Its workbook format organizes the material step by step, and the publication as a whole provides exciting ways for others–groups of children as well as artists and designers–to apply the method themselves. In accompanying essays, Andrew Blauvelt elaborates on the implications of such processes for art and design, and Koert van Mensvoort describes how Conditional Design could form the basis for the design and organization of the city of Zhiango, China, in 2050.

Making Things Talk

Make microcontrollers, PCs, servers, and smartphones talk to each other.

Building electronic projects that interact with the physical world is good fun. But when the devices you’ve built start to talk to each other, things really get interesting. With 33 easy-to-build projects –Make: Making Things Talk, Second Edition shows you how to get your gadgets to communicate with you and your environment. It’s perfect for people with little technical training but a lot of interest.

Maybe you’re a science teacher who wants to show students how to monitor the weather in several locations at once. Or a sculptor looking to stage a room of choreographed mechanical sculptures. In this expanded edition, you’ll learn how to form networks of smart devices that share data and respond to commands.

 

Physical Computing: Sensing and Controlling the Physical World with Computers

 

Physical computing is all around us-from interactive displays at museums to “puff sensors” that aid the physically challenged. With a multiple book buying audience, this book doesn’t require a specific background or technical experience. It is designed to help make a more interesting connection between the physical world and the computer world. The audience size is comparable to that of the Robot builder market. In addition to this audience, physical computing is also taught at several universities across the US. This book is a great source of information and knowledge for anyone interested in bridging the gap between the physical and the virtual.